#42 The power of Augmented Reality- Puppets and Animation to communicate climate action.

Climapreneur
Climapreneur
#42 The power of Augmented Reality- Puppets and Animation to communicate climate action.
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“The main characteristic of Priya and the challenge that she always overcomes in the comic is overcoming fear. Fear is the one thing that I noticed a lot of survivors have to overcome, in order to get to the point of understanding and healing. And that’s what Priya really emphasises and even emphasises, in this comic book about climate change, our fear of this overwhelming problem should not stop us from taking action. ” – Ram Devineni

“Any kind of oppression or injustice usually involves trying to make the victims feel like they’re alone. And so, so many different types of oppression, tried to break down the bonds between people because we do naturally cooperate. And we just need to remember that this is our strength. This is what we can do. If we work together, we can change things.” – Raven Kaliana

“If you want to say something that you want people to listen to, or if you want to communicate about topics that are not easy to communicate about, you should lean into your creativity. Any important message can reach even more people, if it has a creative essence.”- Shubhra Prakash

PRIYA — India’s first female superhero, Named a ‘gender equality champion’ by UN Women, the project was funded through a grant from the North India Office (NIO) of the U.S. Embassy New Delhi. Preserving the time-honoured tradition, Priya is escorted by the flying tiger, Sahas, and together they have to protect their enchanted forest from greedy industrialists threatening to cut down all the trees.With the help of a little girl named Somya and the local villagers, they defend their home — reminiscent of India’s Chipko movement. Priya shows Somya, who is suffering from asthma due to the toxic haze — the beauty of her forest and its power to heal Mother Earth and her.

In the film, Priya as a puppet interviews Dr. Vandana Shiva about the Chipko movement — a nonviolent protest by local Indian women to halt deforestation in Himalayan region. It became a rallying point for many future environmental movements all over the world. Priya talks with climate scientists Chris Rapley and Simon Lewis at University College London, and environmental activists Ridhima Pandey and Alexandria Villaseñor, who were part of Youth Climate Strikes, about how young people can join together and address local and global issues.

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